Audio feedback benefits

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There is much agreement in the literature about the benefits of using audio feedback. Here are some of the points that are commonly made with example citations.

Audio feedback, in its various forms, is,

  • Timely – received when useful or available when needed
    (Nortcliffe & Middleton, 2008)

  • Clear and comprehensible – tone, nuance, and personal input add layers of meaning for the recipient
    (Carruthers et al., 2015; Laughton, 2013; Gould & Day, 2013; Olesova & Richardson, 2011; Middleton et al., 2009; Davis & Ryder, 2009; Nortcliffe & Middleton, 2009).

  • Formative – it is suited to qualitative engagement, reinforces the construction of knowledge, can be motivational, and leads to ‘feedforward’ actions
    (Olesova, & Richardson, 2011; Nortcliffe & Middleton, 2008)

  • Personalised – the use of voice powerfully connects the tutor to the student, emphasising a sense of care and interest in the student’s work
    (Chalmers et al., 2014; Olesova, & Richardson, 2011; Lunt & Curran, 2010; Dixon, 2009; Merry & Orsmond, 2008; Nortcliffe & Middleton, 2008; Ice et al., 2007; Rotherham, 2007)

  • Richer and more authentic – the giving of feedback is more easily situated in meaningful real world activities and environments
    (Blackburn, 2015; King, McGuigan & Bunyan, 2008)

  • Promotes a culture of interactivity – the capture of spoken feedback emphasises the value of conversation and interpersonal interaction to learning
    (Orsmond et al., 2013)

  • Time efficient – recorded feedback is often quicker to produce than written feedback
    (Lunt & Curran, 2010; Dixon, 2009; Rotherham, 2009; Ice et al., 2007; Nortcliffe & Middleton, 2007)

  • Engaging and replayable – students like to play, pause, rewind and listen again.

  • Permanent – audio feedback is an effective way of capturing significant but otherwise ephemeral and informal discussions on a student’s work.

  • High quality and great quantity – providing detailed explanations to clarify concepts and processes
    (Voelkel & Mello, 2014; Rotherham, 2009; Merry & Orsmond, 2008)

  • Engaging and promotes a sense of presence – as an online or blended tool (Olesova & Richardson, 2011)
  • Better than illegible handwriting – (Walker, 2009)

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